Tooth Extractions

Although dentists try to save natural teeth when possible, sometimes tooth extractions are necessary. There are two kinds of extraction. In a simple extraction, the tooth in question can be seen and gripped about the gumline. For a simple extraction, the dentist loosens the tooth with an instrument called an elevator. Then the dentist uses forceps to remove the tooth. If a tooth is broken off at the gumline or has not yet emerged from the gums, a surgical extraction is called for. This procedure is common for impacted wisdom teeth.

Reasons for Pulling Teeth

The most common reason that patients have for extracting a tooth is tooth decay. When a tooth is badly decayed and has lost much, if not all, of its structural strength, pulling the tooth is often the right choice.

Infection. When decay has entered the tooth pulp, bacteria enter the tooth’s center and cause infection. Given that this area of the tooth is rich with blood vessels, the infection can feed off the nutrient-rich pulp and spread rapidly.

Gum disease (periodontal disease). Advanced gum disease causes gum tissue to recede. If the recession is severe enough, it may be necessary to remove a tooth.

What to expect from a tooth extraction at Dental Wellness of Suffern

Your dentist will numb the tooth to be removed as well as surrounding gum tissues. After the tooth is pulled, a blood clot forms inside the socket. The blood clot protects the jawbone and nerves from exposure to bacteria. Your dentist will have you bite down on a gauze pad (you’ll still be numb and experience no pain) to slow and stop bleeding.

It’s critical to tell your dentist before tooth extraction if you:

  • Have implanted or artificial heart valves
  • Compromised immune system
  • History of bacterial endocarditis or heart problems of any sort
  • Liver disease
  • Any artificial joints
  • If you’re being treated with a class of drugs called bisphosphonates, let your dentist know before having a tooth pulled.

Aftercare

  • Take painkillers as prescribed.
  • Leave gauze pads in place for 3-4 hours after extraction, changing them when they become saturated with blood or saliva.
  • Don’t rinse forcefully for 24 hours. After a day, you may gently rinse your mouth out with a solution of salt water.
  • Do not use from a straw for the first 24 hours.
  • Don’t smoke, as the inhalation/sucking could dislodge the blood clot.

Visit Dr. Sherri Alpert at Dental Wellness of Suffern, NY for all your dental needs.

845-918-1801 Book an Appointment